Now Viewing: Mobile health/mhealth

Open mHealth Announces Linq

Sep 8, 2014, 1:58 PM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Linq from grantee OpenMHealth

Personal Health Data Goes to the Doctor

Jul 9, 2014, 9:15 AM, Posted by Christine Nieves, Steve Downs

Open mHealth Logo

Since the advent of the stethoscope, information-gathering technology has been helping doctors and other medical professionals improve patient health. Over the past decade, RWJF has funded a series of projects that suggest helping patients track and share data with their clinicians can strengthen the patient-clinician partnership and improve health outcomes. It makes sense that giving clinicians access to patient-tracked health data can improve the health of individuals and communities. As simple as the concept may sound, though, unlocking personal health data for clinical purposes has proven quite challenging. 

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A Conversation with the Health Data Exploration Project

Mar 31, 2014, 1:12 PM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Person tracking their health data on a mobile device.

RWJF’s Lori Melichar and Steve Downs sat down with grantees Kevin Patrick and Jerry Sheehan who lead the Health Data Exploration project to discuss early insights from their work, shared in the recent report Personal Data for the Public Good: New Opportunities to Enrich Understanding of Individual and Population Health.”

Patrick and Sheehan are working on a team that is exploring the use of personal health data in research and how to bridge the “worlds” of individuals who track data about their own personal health, companies that develop tracking apps and devices and typically hold these data, and health researchers.

Here are highlights from their conversation:

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What's Next Health: Designing an Elegant Health Care Process

Mar 20, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Jay Parkinson, founder of Sherpaa Jay Parkinson, founder of Sherpaa

Each month, What’s Next Health talks with leading thinkers with big ideas about the future of health and health care. Recently, we talked with Jay Parkinson, founder of Sherpaa, who challenged us to consider what a more "beautifully designed" health care system might look like. As you'll read in his post below, Jay’s trying to do just that through his work at Sherpaa. (Jay’s opinions are not necessarily those of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.)

By Jay Parkinson

Everything great comes from an elegantly designed process. Just think of all of the experiences we love and use on a daily basis. Consider the iPhone. Apple re-imagined what a phone, or rather, a tiny computer in your pocket, could be and created a revolutionary device. Steve Jobs designed not only the interface that changed computing forever, but Tim Cook designed the manufacturing and material sourcing processes that enabled them to produce a remarkably complicated device at a relatively inexpensive price. They understood that, in order to deliver an exceptional user experience, they had to design the entire process, from the interface to the factory.

Health care was never designed. It just happened, revolving mostly around doctors’ needs and wants, in a culture that strongly believed “doctor knows best.” But our culture changed with the democratization of health information and other industries quickly evolved, raising consumers’ expectations of what health care could and should be.

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The Body-Data Craze, the Hype Cycle and Why It Matters

Jul 3, 2013, 11:15 AM, Posted by Steve Downs

Visualizations of health data at Calit2 Health data visualization at Calit2. Photo courtesy of Calit2

On my way out to visit the Calit2 team that is running the Health Data Exploration project (sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Pioneer Portfolio), I read Alissa Quart's excellent piece in Newsweek about the Quantified Self (QS) movement and health. The article covers many of the possible benefits as well as the downsides of self-tracking.

As Quart acknowledges, she also focuses quite a bit on the edge cases, the extreme QSers, painting a picture that can seem a little ridiculous. It’s inevitable; whenever a new technology emerges, a subset of early adopters takes it to the extreme, making the technology and its applications easy for us to mock (see "glasshole").

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