Category Archives: Public health

Sep 29 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 29

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EBOLA UPDATE: NIH Admits Ebola-Exposed U.S. Physician for Treatment
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) yesterday admitted an Ebola-exposed U.S. physician for treatment at the NIH’s Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. The unidentified physician became exposed to the virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone; the NIH declined to comment on whether the physician had been infected. "When someone is exposed, you want to put them into the best possible situation so if something happens you can take care of them," said NIH infectious disease chief Anthony Fauci, MD, according to the Associated Press. Read more on Ebola.

Electronic Devices Can Keep Kids Up at Night, Should Be Out of Bedrooms
Almost three out of four U.S. children ages 6 to 17 sleep in a bedroom with at least one electronic device—and such children sleep an average of one fewer hour per night, according to Jill Creighton, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Stony Brook Children’s Hospital. According to Creighton, backlit electronic devices such as tablets, smartphones and video games can interrupt sleep and keep people awake, making it important for parents to get their kids in electronics-free bedtime routines. “The hour before bed should be a no-electronics zone,” she said in a release. “The burst of light from a phone (even if it’s just to check the time) can break a sleep cycle. A regular alarm clock is best.” Read more on pediatrics.

Study: Kids as Young as 6 Can Already See Academic and Social Issues Due to ADHD
Children as young as 6 to 8 years old can experience academic problems and difficulty with social skills due to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is exacerbated by the fact that approximately 80 percent of kids with ADHD symptoms have not been diagnosed with the disorder, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers tested approximately 400 kids at 43 Australian schools, finding 179 with ADHD and 212 without; by following their academic careers, the researchers determined that by the second grade the kids with ADHD were more likely to be below-average in reading and mathematics, and to experience more difficulty connecting with their peers, indicating the need to identify and treat ADHD earlier. "Already at this stage, which is relatively young, it's very clear the children have important functional problems in every domain we registered," said study lead author Daryl Efron, MD, a developmental-behavioral pediatrician with the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, according to HealthDay. "On every measure, we found the kids with ADHD were performing far poorer than the control children." Read more on mental health.

Sep 26 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 26

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EBOLA UPDATE: American Physician Declared Ebola-Free, Released From Hospital
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
Rick Sacra, MD, an American physician who was working in an obstetrics clinic in Liberia when he became infected with the Ebola virus, has been cleared as disease-free by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and released from The Nebraska Medical Center. He entered the facility, which includes one of the United States’ few biocontainment units, three weeks ago. Kenty Brantly, MD, who was previously and successfully treated for Ebola at Emory Hospital in Atlanta, had donated two pints of his blood for Sacra’s treatment. Read more on Ebola.

UTHealth to Use $1.3M Grant to Study Asthma Risk for Health Care Workers
As asthma prevalence continues to rise across the country, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health will utilize a four-year, $1.3 million grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to study how the risk of asthma has changed for Texas health care workers over the past decade. The health care field is one of the population groups that see a higher risk for the breathing disorder. For the study, researchers will repeat a 2003 survey which found that, after entering the field, 7.3 percent of nurses and 4.2 to 5.6 percent of doctors, respiratory therapists and occupational therapists developed asthma. “Practices in hospitals have changed in 10 years. There are new cleaning chemicals, including many environmentally friendly ones, but are those products without risk? We want to find out,” said George Delclos, MD, PhD, co-principal investigator and professor in the Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics & Environmental Sciences at the UTHealth School of Public Health. Read more on health disparities.

HHS: $212M to Strengthen State, Local Programs Designed to Prevent Chronic Diseases
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced yesterday that it will award nearly $212 million in grants to help all 50 states and the District of Columbia strengthen efforts to prevent chronic diseases. A total of 193 awards will go to state and local programs, and are funded in part through the Affordable Care Act. “Tobacco use, high blood pressure, and obesity are leading preventable causes of death in the United States,” said U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, in a release. “These grants will enable state and local health departments, national and community organizations, and other partners from all sectors of society to help us prevent heart disease, cancer, stroke, and other leading chronic diseases, and help Americans to live longer, healthier, and more productive lives.” Read more on prevention.

Sep 25 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 25

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EBOLA UPDATE: Public Health Experts Worried About a ‘New Normal’ For Ebola
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
With the World Health Organization announcing that the death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has now surpassed 2,900 people, public health experts are increasingly resigning themselves to the very real possibility that the outbreak will go on for a very long time. Previous human outbreaks were either stopped quickly or in no more than a few months. However, this outbreak is taking hold in urban areas—previous outbreaks were found in rural areas with smaller, more spread out populations—making it unlike any of the others. “What’s always worked before—contact tracing, isolation and quarantine—is not going to work, and it’s not working now,” said Daniel Lucey, a professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Georgetown University Medical Center, according to The Washington Post. Read more on Ebola.

Common Painkillers Linked to Increased Risk of Blood Clots
Common painkillers including aspirin, naproxen and ibuprofen may be linked to an increased risk of developing dangerous blog clots known as venous thromboembolisms (VTE), according to a new study in the journal Rheumatology. The painkillers are all types of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Researchers analyzed the results of six studies that included 21,401 VTE events, finding that patients who used NSAIDs were almost twice as likely to develop the clots. "Our results show a statistically significant increased VTE risk among NSAIDs users. Why NSAIDs may increase the risk of VTE is unclear,” said study lead author Patompong Ungprasert, in a release. “It is possibly related to COX-2 inhibition leading to thromboxane-prostacyclin imbalance. Physicians should be aware of this association and NSAIDs should be prescribed with caution, especially in patients already at a higher risk of VTE." Read more on heart and vascular health.

U.S. Lags Behind Much of Europe in Infant Mortality Rates
The United States continues to lag behind much of Europe and several other developed nations when it comes to infant mortality rates, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Approximately 6.1 U.S. infants died per every 1,000 live births in 2010. While that was down from the rate of 6.87 in 2005, it was still double the rates of Finland, Japan, Portugal, Sweden, the Czech Republic and Norway. "I think we've known for a long time that the U.S. has a higher preterm birth rate, but this higher infant mortality rate for full-term, big babies who should have really good survival prospects is not what we expected," said lead author Marian MacDorman, a senior statistician and researcher in the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, according to HealthDay. Reasons for the United States’ high rate include prenatal care that leads to the birth of more at-risk preemies, as well as disparities in prenatal care. Read more on maternal and infant health.

Sep 24 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 24

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EBOLA UPDATE: Number of Cases Could Reach 1.4M by January in Worst-Case Scenario
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
As many as 1.4 million people could be infected by the Ebola outbreak in Liberia and Sierra Leone by the end of January, according to the latest estimates from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Earlier this week, a study in the New England Journal of Medicine also “warned that the epidemic might never be fully controlled and that the virus could become endemic,” according to The Washington Post. U.S. officials, however, noted that neither of these worst-case scenario estimates take into account public health efforts enacted since August and other planned efforts in the weeks and months ahead. Read more on Ebola.

Health Insurance Marketplace Will Include 77 New Issuers in 2015
Next year will see a 25 percent increase in the number of issuers offering coverage on the Health Insurance Marketplace, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Among the preliminary report’s findings:

  • In the 44 states for which there is data, 77 issuers will be newly offering coverage in 2015
  • The Federal Marketplace states will have 57 more issuers in 2015, a 30 percent net increase over this year
  • The eight State-based Marketplaces where data is already available will have a total of six more issuers in 2015, a ten percent net increase over this year
  • Four of the 36 states in the Federal Marketplace will have at least double the number of issuers they had in 2014
  • In total, 36 states of the 44 will have at least one new issuer next year

Read more on the Affordable Care Act.

Study: The Younger a Person is When they First Drink, the More Likely they’ll Develop an Alcohol Problem
The younger a person is when they begin drinking, the more likely they are to develop an alcohol abuse problem, according to a new study in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. Researchers based their findings on a survey of 295 high school students—163 girls and 132 boys—which asked about when they first tried alcohol, when they first became drunk, how often they drank alcohol in the preceding month and how often they engaged in binge drinking. According to the researchers, their findings can help determine the best methods to stop alcohol abuse problems before they develop. "If age of any use is the primary risk factor, our efforts should be primarily focused on preventing initiation of any use. If, however, age of first intoxication—or delay from first use to first intoxication—is a unique risk factor above and beyond age of first use, prevention efforts should also target those who have already begun drinking in an effort to prevent the transition to heavy drinking,” said Meghan E. Morean, assistant professor of psychology at Oberlin College, Ohio and adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, in a release. Read more on alcohol.

Sep 23 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 23

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EBOLA UPDATE: 20,000 Cases by December Unless Significant Measures are Taken
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
More than 20,000 people could have been infected by Ebola by early November unless public health officials quickly enhance their control measures in West Africa, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO) and Imperial College, London, reviewed data since the start of the outbreak, which they identified as December 2013. Between Dec. 30 and Sept. 14 a total of 4,507 cases were reported to the WHO. Read more on Ebola.

HHS: $99 Million to Improve Youth Mental Health Services
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced approximately $99 million in grants to improve mental health services for young people across the country. The grants include:

  • Approximately $34 million to train more than 4,000 new mental health providers, as well as expand and support Minority Fellowship Programs
  • Approximately $48 million to help teachers, schools and communities recognize and respond to potential youth mental health issues
  • Approximately $16.7 million to support 17 new Healthy Transitions grants, which will improve access to treatment and support services for people ages 16 to 25 that have or are at high risk of developing a serious mental health condition

Read more on mental health.

FDA: New Challenge to Develop Innovative Ways to Identify Foodborne Pathogens
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced a $500,000 challenge to encourage the creation of “breakthrough” and innovative solutions on how to find disease-causing, microbial pathogens—including Salmonella—in fresh produce. The 2014 FDA Food Safety Challenge was developed under the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. “We are thrilled to announce the FDA’s first incentive prize competition under the America COMPETES Act,” said Michael Taylor, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, in a release. “This is an exciting opportunity for the federal government to collaborate with outside experts to bring forth breakthrough ideas and technologies that can help ensure quicker detection of problems in our food supply and help prevent foodborne illnesses.” According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one in six Americans are sickened by foodborne illness each year, leading to approximately 3,000 deaths. Read more on food safety.

Sep 22 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 22

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UPDATE: Sierra Leone Ends Three-Day Lockdown, Reports 130 New Cases
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
Officials in Sierra Leone have ended a three-day curfew designed to help contain the continuing spread of the Ebola virus, calling the effort a success. Authorities reported 130 new cases during the lockdown and are waiting for tests on 39 more people. The West African country has been one of the hardest hit by the outbreak—more than 550 of the nearly 2,800 total deaths have been in Sierra Leone. In addition more than 100 tons of health-related supplies are being flown to Sierra Leone and Liberia. They include gloves, masks, gowns, goggles, saline, antibiotics, oral rehydration solution and painkillers. "We must do all we can to reduce further the human tragedy caused by this deadly outbreak and help communities avoid an even deeper setback than has occurred already," said Chief Executive Thomas Tighe of Direct Relief, according to USA Today. Read more on Ebola.

Study: Medicare Patients Less Likely to Receive Post-Stroke Surgery
Despite the fact that it can significantly help recovery and reduce the risk of long-term disability or even death, a common post-stroke surgical treatment is far less likely to be referred by physicians of patients with Medicare, according to a new study in the journal PLOS One. Researchers at the University of Florida (UF) analyzed data on more than 21,000 adult patients discharged from 2003 to 2008 with a diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage, finding that—when compared to patients with private insurance—Medicare patients were almost 45 percent less likely to receive surgery and were more than twice as likely to die in the hospital. Azra Bihorac, MD, the study’s senior author and an associate professor of anesthesiology, medicine and surgery at the UF College of Medicine, said the results could indicate a conscious or unconscious bias. “Not every hospital has skilled neurosurgeons who specialize in subarachnoid hemorrhage,” he said in a release. “If these hospitals don’t have the necessary expertise, then they may actually overestimate the risk of a bad prognosis. They may assume that the patient won’t do well anyway, so they won’t proceed with surgery.” Read more on access to care.

Study: Weekly Text Reminders about Calories Help People Make Healthier Choices
Something as simple as a weekly text reminder may help U.S. adults develop a better understanding of basic nutrition and make healthier food choices, according to a new study in Health Promotion Practice. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health sent either a weekly text message reminder, a weekly email reminder, or no weekly reminder about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s recommendation of a reasonable daily caloric intake—2,000 calories—to 246 participants dining in the Johns Hopkins Hospital cafeteria. They found that at the beginning of the study approximately 58 percent knew the recommended benchmark, but after four weeks the participants who received texts were twice as likely to know the benchmark. “While daily energy needs vary, the 2,000-calorie value provides a general frame of reference that can make menu and product nutrition labels more meaningful,” said study leader Lawrence J. Cheskin, MD, director of the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center, in a release. “When people know their calorie ‘budget’ for the day, they have context for making healthier meal and snack choices.” Read more on nutrition.

Sep 19 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 19

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EBOLA UPDATE: Sierre Leone on Three-Day Lockdown
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
Today the nation of Sierra Leone began a three-day lockdown in an effort to slow the spread of the Ebola virus. "Today, the life of everyone is at stake, but we will get over this difficulty if all do what we have been asked to do," said President Ernest Bai Koroma. "These are extraordinary times and extraordinary times require extraordinary measures." The ongoing outbreak has so far killed at least 2,630 people and infected a total of 5,357 people. Read more on Ebola.

FDA Revises Proposed Rules to Prevent Foodborne Illnesses
Taking into account the public comments stemming from its extensive outreach, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued revisions to four proposed rules designed to promote food safety and help prevent foodborne illness. The rules include produce safety, preventive controls for human food, preventive controls for animal food and the foreign supplier verification program. “Ensuring a safe and high-quality food supply is one of the FDA’s highest priorities, and we have worked very hard to gather and respond to comments from farmers and other stakeholders regarding the major proposed FSMA regulations,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, MD, in a release. “The FDA believes these updated proposed rules will lead to a modern, science-based food safety system that will better protect American consumers from potentially hazardous food. We look forward to public comment on these proposals.” Read more on food safety.

CDC: Too Many Americans Don’t Receive a Flu Vaccination
At a news conference this morning, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Thomas Frieden, MD, stressed the need for all people ages 6 months and older to be vaccinated for the upcoming flu season. According to the CDC, fewer than half of eligible Americans get vaccinations resulting in unnecessary lost work days, hospitalizations and even death. "It's really unfortunate that half of Americans are not getting the protection from flu they could get," said Frieden, according to HealthDay. More than 100 children died from the flu-relate complications last year, and approximately 90 percent of them were unvaccinated. Read more on influenza.

Sep 18 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 18

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EBOLA UPDATE: Death Toll to at Least 2,622
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
The World Health Organization announced today that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has now claimed at least 2,622 lives and infected at least 5,335 people. "The upward epidemic trend continues in the three countries that have widespread and intense transmission—Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone," the global health agency said in a statement, adding that the disease’s spread through Liberia is in large part due to an increasing number of cases in the capital of Monrovia. Read more on Ebola.

HHS to Sponsor the Development of a Portable Ventilator for Use in Public Health Emergencies
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is sponsoring the development of a next-generation portable ventilator for use in pandemics and other public health emergencies. The low-cost, user-friendly device will be developed with Philips Respironics under a $13.8 million contract; the project will be overseen by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) within the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. “In pandemics and other emergencies, doctors must have medicines, vaccines, diagnostics, and critical equipment such as mechanical ventilators at the ready in order to save lives,” said BARDA Director Robin Robinson, PhD, in a release. Read more on preparedness.

HUD Launches $1B National Disaster Resilience Competition
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is launching a $1 billion National Disaster Resilience Competition to help state, local and tribal leaders prepare their communities for the impacts of climate change and other factors using federal funds. “The National Disaster Resilience Competition is going to help communities that have been devastated by natural disasters build back stronger and better prepared for the future,” said HUD Secretary Julián Castro, in a release. “This competition will help spur innovation, creatively distribute limited federal resources, and help communities across the country cope with the reality of severe weather that is being made worse by climate change.” Read more on disasters.

Sep 17 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 17

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White House Announces Significant Increase in U.S. Ebola Response
Yesterday, NewPublicHealth reported President Obama’s initial planned response to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The White House has since expanded on the plans. They will include:

  • A military command center in Liberia.
  • A staging area in Senegal to help dispatch personnel and aid to affected communities more quickly
  • Personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service will deploy to a new field hospitals the U.S. is setting up in Liberia.
  • US AID will help distribute home kits with items such as gloves and masks to help reduce the number of Ebola cases.

Read more about Ebola.

Survey Finds Doctors are Overextended or At Capacity for Patients
A new survey of 20,000 doctors by the Physicians Foundation, a non-profit group that works with practicing physicians, finds that 81 percent of doctors say they are over-extended or at full capacity and only 19 percent indicate they have time to see more patients. Forty-four percent of doctors responding say they plan to take steps that would reduce patient access to their practices , including cutting back on patients seen, retiring, working part-time, closing their practice to new patients or seeking non-clinical jobs, leading to the potential loss of tens of thousands of physicians in the United States. The timing of the survey is significant because signup for health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act begins in just a few weeks. Read more about access to care.

Number of Smokers Increases in New York City
Earlier this week the New York City Health Department released new 2013 data showing that 16.1 percent of adult New Yorkers are smokers, a significant increase from the city’s lowest recorded adult smoking rate of 14 percent in 2010. For the first time since 2007, there are more than one million smokers in New York City who are at risk of developing a smoking-related illness, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, emphysema, lung and other cancers, according to the health department. So far, the city does not have strong data to explain the uptick in smoking. Nationally, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 18 percent of U.S. adults are smokers, down from 20 percent several years ago. However, New York City is often a bellwether for public health issues, and the health experts across the country will be looking to see whether the city’s tobacco control efforts—including a new ad campaign that focuses on both daily and occasional smokers—have an impact on smoking rates. Read more on tobacco.

Sep 16 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 16

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EBOLA UPDATE: Obama to Commit as Many as 3,000 Troops to Epidemic Response
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
President Obama will today announce an expansion of military and medical resources that could send as many as 3,000 people to West Africa to help combat the ongoing Ebola outbreak. According to The New York Times, the United States will help train health workers and build as many as 17 Ebola treatment centers, which will house approximately 1,700 treatment beds. The U.S. Department of Defense will also open a joint command operation in Liberia in order to coordinate an international response to the outbreak. Read more on Ebola.

Report: 1 in 9 People Worldwide are Chronically Undernourished
An estimated 805 million people in the world are chronically undernourished, according to a new report, The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2014, from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. While that means that approximately one in every nine people are undernourished, the number is down more than 100 million over the past decade and 209 million since 1990-1992. In the past two decades the prevalence of undernourishment has also dropped from 23.4 percent to 13.5 percent in developing countries. According to the health agency, the eradication of hunger requires a sustained political commitment that emphasizes food security and nutrition. Read more on global health.

SAMHSA: Percentage of Youth Using Illegal Drugs is Down Over the Past Decade
The percentage of U.S. teens using illegal drugs is down over the past decade, according to a new study from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA). The report, the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, found that the rate of illicit drug use in the past month for adolescents ages 12-17 was 8.8 percent, down from 9.5 percent in 2012 and 11.6 percent in 2002. From 2002 to 2013, the percentage of youth in that age group with a substance abuse or dependence problem dropped from 8.9 percent to 5.2 percent. “This report shows that we have made important progress in some key areas, but that we need to rejuvenate our efforts to promote prevention, treatment and recovery to reach all aspects of our community,” said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde, in a release. “The real lives represented by these statistics deserve our protection and help from the ravages of substance use disorders. Through a comprehensive, national effort we can help people avoid, or recover from substance use problems and lead, healthy, productive lives.” Read more on substance abuse.