Category Archives: Leadership development

Oct 8 2014
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Proud to be ‘The Nurse on the Board’!

This week marks the 4th anniversary of the Institute of Medicine’s future of nursing report. Fran Roberts, PhD, RN, FAAN, is owner and executive leader of the Fran Roberts Group, a consulting and contracting practice providing expertise on health care leadership, higher education, governance, regulation and patient safety. The Kate Aurelius Visiting Professor for the University of Arizona College of Medicine–Phoenix, Roberts serves on the boards of directors of several health care organizations, including the Presbyterian Central New Mexico Health System. She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive News Fellows program.

Fran Roberts

“Leadership from nurses is needed at every level and across all settings.” That’s what the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing panel wrote in its 2011 report—a message I’ve taken to heart. Here’s why the IOM was exactly right.

I’ve served (and still serve) on several health-related boards, in most cases as the only nurse in a group dominated by physicians, local business leaders, and administrators. My experience on the Presbyterian Central New Mexico Healthcare Services board, which I now chair, is both representative and instructive. I joined the board about eight years ago, recruited by one of my colleagues in the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program, Kathy Davis, RN, the senior vice president and chief nursing officer at Presbyterian.

It was an honor to be asked, doubly so because I live and work out of state. But Presbyterian had concluded that it needed a nurse with executive experience on its board, so I got the call.

I started my first term on the board determined not to pigeon-hole myself as “the nurse on the board.” I didn’t want my fellow board members to think I had tunnel vision, unable to see beyond the need to advocate for nurses. That’s not to say I didn’t intend to advocate for nurses when that was called for, but I didn’t want to be limited to that, either in my colleagues’ estimation or in reality.

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Oct 7 2014
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A Business Community Board Role Broadens a Nurse Leader’s Horizons

This week marks the 4th anniversary of the Institute of Medicine’s future of nursing report. Sandra McDermott, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, is an assistant professor of nursing and the director of health and service related professions at Tarleton State University in Fort Worth, Texas. A member of the Texas Team Action Coalition, which recently launched the Nurses On Board training program, she is a newly appointed member of the board of directors for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce South Area Council.

Sandra McDermott

I have been in my university director position for about six months now, and I knew that before I started teaching classes this fall, I had an opportunity to really get involved in the Fort Worth community. I wanted to get my name out there, because when I do that, I am getting my school’s name out there, too. I started attending Chamber events and enjoyed them, and I realized that the South Area Council is the one that encompasses the hospital district, which is where I want to have a lot of my connections.

If my role is to draw nursing students and build awareness for our nursing programs, then clearly, focusing on the hospital district makes a lot of sense. I had made a strong connection with a South Area Council board member, so I lobbied the Chamber to join the board, and they ultimately added a new spot and appointed me to it, which was very humbling. They did not have a university represented on the Council, and they saw value in having a nurse and an educator join them.

The main campus for my school is about 90 miles away. Everyone knows about our presence there, where there are around 8,600 students. But in Fort Worth, we have around 1,600 students, and the nursing programs are relatively new and very small. I knew I needed to be out in the community as we build up our programs, and what better way to do it than to be at multiple Chamber functions? And as a board member, I knew I could influence a lot more people. In the hospital district, I can go in as not only a nurse and an educator, but a Chamber leader as well. That is a great platform to advocate for my school programs and for wellness and health care as community priorities.

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Oct 6 2014
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Celebrating Four Years of Nurses Leading Change to Advance Health

Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, directs the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, which is implementing recommendations from that report. Hassmiller also is senior adviser for nursing for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Susan Hassmiller

This week marks the fourth anniversary of The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, the landmark Institute of Medicine (IOM) report that galvanized the nursing field and partners to participate in health system transformation. Nurses nationwide are heeding the report’s call to prepare for leadership roles at the national, state and community levels. Why?  Simply put, nurses coordinate and provide care across every setting, and they can represent the voices of patients, their families and communities. Nurses are the reality check on committees and in boardrooms.

The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, a national initiative led by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and AARP to implement recommendations from the future of nursing report, is promoting nursing leadership—and I’m thrilled by our progress.

To date, Action Coalitions report that 268 nurses have been appointed to boards. Virginia has implemented an innovative program to recognize outstanding nurse leaders under age 40, and several other states including Arkansas, Nebraska and Tennessee are offering similar programs. New Jersey has set a goal of placing a nurse leader on every hospital board. Texas has partnered with the Texas Healthcare Trustees to provide its nurses with governance and leadership education to prepare them for board leadership. Even better, other states are fostering nursing leadership by adopting these best practices.

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Oct 2 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Autism and birth order, nurse staffing and underweight infants, long-term care insurance, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

There is an increased risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) among children born less than one year or more than five years after the birth of their next oldest sibling, Forbes reports. The study, led by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna Keely Cheslack-Postava, PhD, MSPH, analyzed the records of 7,371 children born between 1987 and 2005, using data from the Finnish Prenatal Study of Autism. About a third of the children had been diagnosed with ASD by 2007. Researchers found that the risk of ASD for children born less than 12 months after their prior sibling was 50 percent higher than it was for children born two to five years after their prior sibling. “The theory is that the timing between pregnancies changes the prenatal environment for the developing fetus,” Cheslack-Postava said. 

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI). The study, led by Eileen Lake, PhD, RN, FAAN, found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for very low birthweight babies born in those facilities, reports Health Canal. More information is available on the INQRI Blog. The study was covered by Advance Healthcare Network for Nurses, among other outlets.

Because of a “medical-industrial complex” that provides financial incentives to overuse and fragment health care, patients nearing the end of their lives need an advocate to fight for their interests, Joan Teno, MD, MS, writes in an opinion piece for the New York Times. Teno encourages readers to “find a family member or friend who can advocate for the health care that you want and need. Find someone to ask the hard questions: What is your prognosis? What are the benefits and risks of treatments? Find someone not afraid of white coats.” Teno is an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. 

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Aug 21 2014
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New Cohort of RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has announced the 20 accomplished nurses from across the United States selected as RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows for 2014.

Executive Nurse Fellows hold senior leadership positions in health services, scientific and academic organizations, public health and community-based organizations or systems, and professional, governmental and policy organizations. They participate in a three-year leadership development program designed to enhance the effectiveness of nurse leaders who are working to improve the nation’s health care system. Fellows receive coaching, education, and other support to enhance their abilities to lead teams and organizations. The program is located at the Center for Creative Leadership.

More than 200 nurse leaders have participated in the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program since it began in 1998. This will be the program’s final cohort.

Read more about the new cohort of RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows.

Jul 31 2014
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Grants to Build a More Highly Educated Nursing Workforce

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has announced the nine state “Action Coalitions” that will share $2.7 million to advance strategies aimed at creating a more highly educated, diverse nursing workforce. The nine states that are receiving two-year, $300,000 grants through RWJF’s Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN) program are California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Montana, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Texas, and Washington state.  For each, this is the second two-year APIN grant and it will be used to continue encouraging strong partnerships between community colleges and universities to make it easier for nurses to transition to higher degrees. 

In its groundbreaking 2010 report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended that 80 percent of the nursing workforce be prepared at the baccalaureate level or higher by the year 2020. Right now, about half the nurses in the United States have baccalaureate or higher degrees.

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Jul 30 2014
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MBA Degrees Give Physicians a Career Boost

Physicians who have both doctor of medicine (MD) and master of business administration (MBA) degrees reported that their dual training had a positive professional impact, according to a study published online by Academic Medicine. The study, one of the first to assess MD/MBA graduates’ perceptions of how their training has affected their careers, focused on physician graduates from the MBA program in health care management at the University of Pennsylvania.

file Mitesh S. Patel

The MD was more often cited as conveying professional credibility, while 40 to 50 percent of respondents said the MBA conveyed leadership, management, and business skills. Respondents also cited multidisciplinary experience and improved communication between the medical and business worlds as benefits of the two degrees.

“Our findings may have significant implications for current and future physician-managers as the landscape of health care continues to change,” lead author Mitesh S. Patel, MD, MBA, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, said in a news release. “A study published in 2009 found that among 6,500 hospitals in the United States, only 235 were run by physicians. Moving forward, changing dynamics triggered by national health care reform will likely require leaders to have a better balance between clinical care and business savvy. Graduates with MD and MBA training could potentially fill this growing need within the sector.”

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Jul 24 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The July 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the July issue.

Nurses Lead Innovations in Geriatrics and Gerontology
As the nation becomes older and more diverse, and more people are living with chronic health problems, nurses are developing innovations in geriatric care. They are finding new ways to improve the quality of care for older adults; increase access to highly skilled health care providers with training in geriatrics; narrow disparities that disproportionately affect older minorities; avoid preventable hospital readmissions; and more. Nurse-led innovations are underway across the nation to improve care for older Americans.

Improving Care for the Growing Number of Americans with Dementia
By 2050, 16 million Americans—more than triple the current number—will have Alzheimer’s disease. RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars are working now to get ahead of the problem. “We’re all well aware of our aging population and how we’re going to see more individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia,” says alumna Elizabeth Galik, PhD, CRNP, who is researching ways to improve functional and physical activity among older adults with dementia.

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Jul 18 2014
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Building a Culture of Health at AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting

RWJF Leadership Reception at the AcademyHealth RWJF Leadership Reception at the AcademyHealth annual meeting in San Diego in June 2014

At this year’s AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting, held in San Diego, California June 8–10, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) hosted “Building a Culture of Health: An RWJF Leadership Reception.” More than 100 RWJF scholars, fellows, and alumni representing 14 RWJF Human Capital programs joined with colleagues and friends of the Foundation for the gathering at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront. There, health providers, clinicians, researchers, and graduate students made and renewed the important professional connections that RWJF facilitates.

Among those attending the reception were RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumnus and RWJF Clinical Scholars Associate Program Director (University of Pennsylvania program site) David Grande, MA, MPA, who presented his paper, “How Do Health Policy Researchers Perceive and Use Social Media to Disseminate Science to Policymakers?,” at the meeting; RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, MPH, RN, and J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, who chaired and served as a panelist, respectively, at a health care workforce session; and Clinical Scholars Tammy Chang, MD, MPH, MS, and Katherine A. Auger, MD, M.Sc., who were both chosen as recipients of the AcademyHealth Presidential Scholarship for New Health Services Researchers. This scholarship provides financial support to attend the meeting, and recognizes early-career researchers who demonstrate leadership ability and potential to contribute to the field of health services research.

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Jul 14 2014
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Breakthrough Leaders in Nursing

The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action has announced a new program to honor nurse leaders who are making a difference in their communities and to develop their leadership skills. The Campaign will be accepting nominations for its Breakthrough Leaders in Nursing award through August 15th.

Nominees must be licensed registered nurses engaged in a state Action Coalition of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. Nominations can come from any member of a state Action Coalition, the Champion Nursing Coalition, or the Champion Nursing Council.

The ten nurses selected for this honor will receive national recognition and a Leadership Development Program scholarship from the Center for Creative Leadership, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).  

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